Your Questions/My Answers: 2003

YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matthew B.
Comments: Hi Trevor, first of all the usual compliments on your work, it's really exciting and encouraging to hear such top notch music. I saw you with Fantomas the two times you came to Sydney and was blown away. Anyway, I make some pocket money on the side teaching bass to kids (15, 16 mostly) and while they usually bring in Limp Bizkit, Korn, etc., I've been getting them to learn some more intricate stuff lately, though my problem is finding it in the first place. I'm looking at avant-garde type stuff I guess, with challenging fretwork, unusual time signatures, etc. but preferably still with a heavy feel to maintain their interest. The last thing I taught them was the left hand piano parts to 'Jazz Study' by John Cage, I'm getting pretty desperate. Well, keep up the good work, hope to see you back here soon.

MY ANSWER:
Well, there is no need to get desperate because there is a lot of stuff out there. If you're into transcribing or reading contemporary classical music, the oeuvre is vast. Bartok is a good pedagogical source, ie, Mikrokosmos, or the string quartets. There is tons of guitar music for this genre as well...
Henze, Takemitsu, Crumb, Wuorinen...
In terms of metal, Dillinger Escape Plan, Meshuggah,---I know I always mention the same metal bands...but these two should keep your students on their toes for quite some time.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: I was wondering if the solo piece you wrote for Jon Deak, "Depaysement", is available for purchase. Let me know. Thanks.

MY ANSWER:
No, it hasn't been recorded. My plan is to record it myself one of these days with a bunch of other "chamber" stuff....you will be informed.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Al
Comments: Hello Trevor,
I recently purchased an upright bass & take lessons weekly. I am very interested in your style of playing on Debs & Cents, How does one approach learning to play like this? What sort of technique should i be studying?
What is your favourite film of all time?
Looking forward to Electric Masada in London! Thanks for your time & the inspiration. Cheers. Al

MY ANSWER:
For whatever kind of music I play, I feel studying traditional technique, which I've talked about a lot on this page, is priceless. What you eventually do with that information is dependent upon your seriousness, and your personality, (which is basically uncontrollable). The "style" of music on D&C is simply an extension of my personality, there is no specific technique geared towards that music. It's the result of studying classical technique, playing jazz, and playing rock.

Bunuel's Simon of the Desert.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Hassan II
Comments: Hey Trevor, just curious as to what you would regard as your favourite Mr. Bungle album?

MY ANSWER:
California.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: dagmar
Comments: trevor, hello. are you familiar with the work of brian ferneyhough? if you are, what are your thoughts on his music and the "new complexity"?

MY ANSWER:
I'm not. Is this like, Boulezphiles? I don't know...I think once in a century is enough....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: A big fan of yours.
Comments: I saw this band called Flattbush, are you familiar with this band. The bass player is crazy.

MY ANSWER:
yes, I agree, they are some muy loco Filipinos. His thumb is like a de-tuned Slingerland bass drum.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: The 64 million dollar QUESTION Will there be a fourth and final Mr.Bungle album, I know it isn't on top of the to-do list but some kind of inkling of info would be nice.

MY ANSWER:
Why not 5th and final? Why can't we skip number 4. Four is bad luck in Japan. But maybe five is a bit too Satanic, you know, pentagrams? Six is obviously not a good idea either. And Seven is probably too predictable. Yeah, I'd say hold your breath.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Rob Jansen
Comments: Trevor, I was just wondering if you recorded with Electric Masada in February like you said you might. I would love to hear an album from you guys.

MY ANSWER:
Didn't happen. Maybe later...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: jason e.
Comments: A website for fans and fanatics opened with a quote from Chomsky! This is highly respectable! I have found your answers highly informative and appropriate regardless of whatever ridiculous banter tossed your way.
1. Do you read Chomsky?
2. Have you heard of bassist/composer Avishai Cohen? What do you think?
3. Why bass? (I realize this is a very generalized question, but could you comment on why you chose to be so dedicated to the instrument. Was it admiration of a bass player when you were younger, or some strange story involving a pact with demons. Please, humor me.)

MY ANSWER:
1) No, I just quote him telepathically. 2) No. 3)Why not? It just happened. Basically because my brother played guitar and I want something similar but
different. After about 2 days there was no escape.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jeremy
Comments: Your own label? When? Why not? How to get signed? When? Why not? DO IT!!!!

MY ANSWER:
Fuck that. I don't need any more pains in my ass. I'm here to play and write. Get signed by being lucky, knowing the right people, being conspicuous and persevering.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: el stinko
Comments: how much input do the members of fantomas have in the songwritting/arranging process? youve mentioned that you've transcribed them to help you learn the pieces, how are they received by you?

MY ANSWER:
Not a whole lot. It's really MPs vision. I transcribe demos that are pretty much in final form, as much a demo can be. Some tweaking happens in the
rehearsal studio, and some more in the recording studio, but the final decisions are mostly made by the leader.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Alan Lawrence
Comments: Trevor, I'm writing a paper on Mr. Bungle, specifically the album California (for a class on irony/parody/humor in music). I was wondering if you thought that that music came from a modernist or post-modernist perspective (any detail you want to get into would be appreciated). Hope to hear from you--love your work! Thanks.

MY ANSWER:
Well wherever it came from it wasn't conscious, at least not in those terms. I don't think of myself as post-modern, but in an inescapable sense, I am. That music comes from a bunch of 30-37 year olds who listen to and play a lot of different kinds of music. Humor, irony, post-irony, neo-whatever, but over-all sincerity are considerations in the song-writing. But we NEVER talked about shit like that.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Andrew Emer
Comments: Hey Trevor,
Love Bungle and I think we might have a few people in common...as I have moved here from the bay area... So, I do have a question for you; I play upright bass in a rock band...In the last year we started playin The Bowery Ballroom and joints a like down south..I am gathering any and all info I can regading how to play upright LOUD in big venues and avoid feedback. So, far I plug my f holes w/foam and have a mesa stack that doesn't seem to give too many problems...but any advice or thoughts you could offer up would be cool since I know you prolly have experience in this area

MY ANSWER:
yeah, that's a tough on. I borrowed a bass in Australia once from a Rockabilly guy. He had made a trap door on hinges in the shoulder where he was able to insert tons of foam. Plus the entire thing, including the f-holes, was covered in tape. I would suggest experimenting with different pick-ups. The Underwood, which is what I use, is quite susceptible to feedback. Also, a lower stage volume with support from monitors will help---although direct sounds through monitors usually sounds like caca. I never liked playing my upright live with Bungle mainly because at such volumes it sounds crappy. I would also check into compressor/limiters. SWR often has a built-in limiter, but they aren't the loudest amps in the world. Sorry I can't be of more help.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hi Trevor - How did the Masada thing come up for you? Also, is any of the Masada songbook available to buy as sheet music ? - I'm learning the oud and am as keen to play downtown Radical Jewish stuff as I am to play the traditional Arabic stuff. Also what's with Jamie Saft's beard???? All the best

MY ANSWER:
I first met Zorn when Bungle asked him to produce our first record. Later, he asked a few of us to play on some of his projects. Eventually I played in a west coast version of the Masada quartet before the group solidified. Moving to NY coincided with some of the first Electric Masada performances.

I don't think the songbook is published. You should just transcribe the stuff yourself.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: ian mcelroy
Comments: Hello trevor, I just read an interview with Patton and I was wondering is Mr Bungle really over?

MY ANSWER:
I went to the most amazing Mexican tacqueria in Brooklyn recently. I used to be kind of a California/Mexican food snob, coming from the west
coast and all. But man! Amazingly fresh shrimp cocktails, beautiful pork tortas, simple but really tasty tacos, divine chalupas...I'm so happy my fat
Mexican friend turned me on to it.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: aaron
Comments: I want to start by saying I'm a big fan of your work and I'm looking forward to the new fantomas album that being seid I'm only now starting to get into jazz and I don't know much about it but I do know that I love Elysian fields (I love femial vocals) and would love to here what you think I might like ? thanks

MY ANSWER:
Sarah Vaughan, Dakota Staton, Jo Stafford, Ella Fitzgerald...Maybe you'd like Ann-Margret; I do. And if you're into Jennifer Charles maybe you'd be into Hope Sandoval although she's not really jazz.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Moo Goo Gai Pan
Comments: Why are you so gay?

MY ANSWER:
It depends on what you mean by the word "so".


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Roger
Comments: Any progress on a new trio-convulsant record? And what records do you recommend with Michael Vatcher playing on them? I've heard from Spruance that he's a total genius and from one of your past posts mentioning him as one of your favorite drummers...

MY ANSWER:
Trio-convulsant in the works.... Vatcher: He's based in Amsterdam. He often plays with a guy named Michael Moore. Check out a band called Available Jelly.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Christian Wight
Comments: Aloha! Hey Trevor, a few qustions if you will . . . 1st. I recently attended the Victoriaville fest and saw you in the audience at a number of shows. What did you think of the bass quartet w/ Leandre,Parker,Phillips, and Saitoh. I was astonished and enchanted, absolutely stellar. See any other shows ya dug?
2nd. As a muscian what do you think about the musicality of electronic/sound instillation type stuff. Do you think it involves a "musical" mind or just a good imagination and familiarity w/ the tools. I play guitar and by no means consider myself a "muscian" . . . adequate sure but no Ribot. But I've played for yrs. and screwed around w/ tons of cool gadgets and recorded lots of "sound scape" stuff that I think sound as good as tons of this kinda thing I see presented at these types of avant festivals and what not. While I love that kinda music I'm kinda torn on its actual musical validity. I mean if I as a average at best muscian can do it . . .?? Any thoughts?

MY ANSWER:
Sorry to say, I wasnt' really into that performance, although I had high hopes. I guess that's what you get when you throw together a bunch of people who are essentially coming from different places and don't really play together often, if ever. I thought Ms. Leandre was making the most effort to listen and leave space. Ultimately I thought the whole thing was a mess. I enjoyed Frith's thing although it was a bit long.

As far as your other question, yeah, there is a lot of hack-bullshit out there. Although, you might say the same thing people have said about Jackson Pollock...oh, well, I could have done THAT....Well, you didn't, HE did. Art and merit is all relative. You know what you like, and if it didn't impress you
than the validity wasn't there for you. I think sound "sculpture" certainly has it's musicality and the artist should take musical responsibility, but more importantly, in order for ME to enjoy it, it's got to have sincerity, emotional shape (or non-shape), structure, and basically something that makes me think it's real. There is no accounting for taste. I saw some stuff up there in Victoriaville that I thought was garbage. Doesn't mean it doesn't have merit...but it doesn't for me.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Morgan Riley
Comments: Trevor, how many groupies do you sleep with a year and what does your girlfriend think about all that?

MY ANSWER:
I've lost track, but since they're all boys, my girlfriend doesn't mind because she knows I'm not gay.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Zeta (Patrick)
Comments: Hello, Trev... Yes, it's me again.
1. I was wondering what your thoughts are on the band Meshuggah, or if you've even heard of them.
2. What about Candiria?
3. According to Senor Pattano, one of the newer Fantomas CDs is going to be "more mellow." Are we to expect a mellowness comparable to some tracks on The Directors Cut (aka. Twin Peaks, Rosemary's Baby, etc...)?
4. Also, isn't it sad that people put so much stock into a way a person replies to them on the internet? Who the fuck cares?

MY ANSWER:
1)Love 'em. Math that you can mosh to cuz it groves.
2)Forgive me, haven't checked 'em out yet.
3)I wouldn't say mellow. I just heard the final mix (and I can say this because I had little to do with it), it's one of the creepiest, tension-filled records I've ever heard.
4)No shit. What ever happened to the good old emotionally weighted, irreversible, hand-scripted letter?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: ajm
Comments: Trevor, I'm wondering, how did Zorn come to produce the debut MB disc? Were you guys fans & sent him a demo, or did another SF muso send him something/recommend you guys etc...??
'Frank Booth Studio': what do you think of it? I ask because I feel some of the recordings that have come out of there lately haven't sounded as good as I expected, i'm mainly referring to "The Gift". There was something I just didn't dig about the sounds (but the music was great) - i feel your bass didn't have the power from other recordings you've done with Zorn (Filmworks was GREAT!) & others...
Forgive me if it's a small & low-buget studio, good on Saft & co.
Looking forward to seeing you in Oz again.

MY ANSWER:
We approached him. He tried to talk us out of it, saying that since we were on WB we would be better off with a more commercial producer. We declined.

The gift was, I believe the first record I ever did at Frank Booth, so obviously, improvements have been subsequent. It's a cramped basement basically, but I really like it. I mean, it's no Avatar...but not all music needs an Avatar. A lot of music has been recorded there. Check out Saft's own stuff!


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hi there Trevor, What are your top 5 breakup albums?

MY ANSWER:
1) The Essential Willie Nelson 2) Willie Nelson: Hello Walls 3)Willie Nelson: The Party's Over 4)Erik Sanko: Past Imperfect, Present Tense 5)Slayer: Reign in Blood


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: jeff
Comments: have you heard pat metheny's new lineup as of yet? may i recommend that you pick up his new disc? what do you think about metheny as a composer?

MY ANSWER:
I used to listen to Metheny more than I do now, which is almost never. I really liked the record he did with Jaco, and Song X. I haven't heard the new
line-up, and I don't really have an opinion about him as a composer. Call me un-informed.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Do you believe there is a point where you can call yourself capable enough to teach? I'm assuming you give double bass lessons. At what point did you begin to teach and how did you begin. Private lessons or thru an agency? I've played electric bass for a number of years, and have been playing double bass for just over 1 year. Is it irresponsible to teach a total beginner double bass when you only have a year's experience? I ask because I need to have an 'industry placement' for my bachelor and I cant imagine having the balls to pretend I know something well enough to teach it. Did you first teach through studying? Do you/did you also teach piano/theory/composition? Do you know what I'm getting at? It could be called a confidence crisis or ethical dilemma or amazement at being employed. I would appreciate some advice and/or history of how you started it - it all seems so alien.

MY ANSWER:
whoa! slow down there! breathe...
ok, I don't think you need TONS of experience especially if you're teaching a total beginner. You DO need to know what you're talking about, to be able
to play what you're talking about, and to be able to answer all kinds of questions, many which come out of left field. Teaching is really an art like anything else and takes practice. The more you do the better you will become. You also learn a lot about yourself in the process.

I started giving lessons when I was in high-school after having 4 or 5 years experience on my instrument, and initially I put up flyers, with the intent of
making a few extra bucks. I always work theory and technique into the lessons, and yes, sometimes seeing it on the keyboard is helpful.

It might be a bit premature for you to start giving lessons on upright with only a years experience. Personally I think there is much more at stake in
terms of learning bad habits, or bad technique on upright than there is on electric bass. Mostly due to the complications of the fingerboard, and, of course, bow technique. I had a bad teacher once who taught me some pretty bad habits which I'm still trying to break. So, yes, take the respsonsibility seriously.

There's also a lot to be said for professional performance experience, recording experience, ...etc. Teaching isn't for everyone. It takes patience,
confidence, time, and skill.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Super Sonic Youth Super Fan-tastic!
Comments: Do you like Sonic youth? What do you think about the band,music, etc...Would like to know yor fots. tenkiu.

MY ANSWER:
Sorry, not a big fan. Some of what I've heard I've liked, but it's just not my cup of tea. I'd rather listen to Led Zepplin or The Swans.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Emilio
Comments: Hi Trevor. Could you please give me a short update on the current status of Mr. Bungle? New record planned or something? Thanx.

MY ANSWER:
My cat is really weird about eating. Most pets come running as soon as you open the can, but my cat is very nonchalant, nibbling thoughout the course of the day and night. She's not eating as much now, I think, because it's so hot.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Hey, I'd like to get together and jam one day. What do you say? I play guitar.

MY ANSWER:
ok, cool. Meet me on the corner at 6:30.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dylan Hawes-Glynn
Comments: I have been wondering what your approach to song writing is. How do you break down the songs you have written for Mr. Bungle (as an example)? Do you take a theoretical (as in music theory) aproach, or not concern yourself with that? I am sure that the composition process is different for each project, but feel free to give me the short version (unless you feel like writing for a few days. Hey, don't let me limit you!) Anyhoo, take care and keep up the good work!

MY ANSWER:
It depends. Sometimes I start with a title, or a melodic idea, or a chord progression. But whatever specific cell I start with, I have a general picture beforehand. And I try not to lose track of the larger-picture. For instance, I'll say, ok, I want to write a melodic modern pop-song that starts sparsly orchestrated and builds gradually all the way to the end. The SHAPE of the piece, in other words, is most important. Sometimes I might even draw a grapic sketch of this shape.

Sometimes I sit down with a guitar and sing melodies, other times it's sitting at the piano sifting through note combinations. I may or may not apply conscious theory. I may record demo/experiments, or I may do it all on paper. Really I have no specific technique or process and all or none of this might happen in the process of the same piece. Ultimately, I study orchestration, I write what sounds good to my ear, I apply variation, I try to make transitions work, and I try to be loyal to my original shape.

It's easy to lose that shape when you're inside the piece dwelling on minute details. For me, I feel that original, sort or organic, primordial shape is what is going to give the piece it's balance and it's emotion.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Richard
Comments: I was just curious what Trevor Dunnís two cents were on Phillip Glass?

MY ANSWER:
nah.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Matt
Comments: Hey trev (or anyone else that can answer this question) ... can you tell me where I can get one of those trevor dunn t-shirts kevin rutmanis is wearing in the photo on the ipecac site? Says "a girls work is trevor dunn". Quality play on words. Lemme know if i can give you my money for one of these.

MY ANSWER:
It's a WOMANS WORK!! As in ...so drop the mop and grab a gun... You need to speak to the Melvins about that one...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: remy de la mora
Comments: so trevor..... is mr. bungle done or what? it seems like you guys are all off pursuing other outlets. was there a falling out or something? and by the way, whats your favorite beer? (i'm a shiner bock man myself)

MY ANSWER:
ah, yes, Shiner Bock from the great region of Texas. I also like Brooklyn Lager, Dog Bolter, Negra Modelo, Newcastle, Hefeweisen....mmmmmmm beer.......


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: I would like to know when or IF there will ever be another MR. BUNGLE album released while i'm still alive? Thank you for your valuable time.

MY ANSWER:
I just found out that Steve Buscemi and John Turturro both live in my neighborhood! Isnt' that cool?!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: trevor dunn
Comments: mr. dunn,my question is simple and im sure it pisses you off to high hell & you will most likely tell me to go there,but if you please?Is mike patton a pain in the ass to work with or is he pretty easy going? also why dont you sing?

MY ANSWER:
When he doesn't have a .357 to my head, screaming obscenities, dangling cash in front of my face, freebasing, punching me in the legs, and asking me do to the impossible on my instrument, he's pretty easy going. It's kinda like working with a Teletubby and Marth Stewart combined.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: blah
Comments: I have a few small questions. I have written a movie and plan to shoot it very soon on DV. Well, the movie is book-ended by two Mr. Bungle Songs (None of Them Knew (beginning) and Merry Go Bye-Bye. Now, how would I go about getting the rights to these songs. Will this music cost thousands of dollars to get because it is on Warner? Who owns what and in what proportions? Thanks if you could help me out with this. Also, what do you think of Tortoise? I think it's good stuff, but they should quit now. Standards fell off a bit in my opinion. Good day.

MY ANSWER:
you know, I haven't the slightest fucking idea. It's probably ok to use whatever you want as long as you give credit where it's due, but don't quote me cuz I don't really know what I'm talking about. You might want to speak with Greg Werckman, Mr. Bungle's so-called manager. The band is no longer signed on with WB, and they never gave a rat's ass anyway. (However, they still own the records, of course).


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Gonk
Comments: great site trevor! i especially like the way you are patient enough to answer so many questions, so here's mine. when/how much/what style can we expect new fantomas material?

MY ANSWER:
We just recorded two records at once. The first one has a medical theme. Most of it doesn't really sound like a "band". It's a collage-type ambient
sound-scape so to speak. I'm sure it will alienate a lot of people, especially those who liked Director's Cut.
The second one has a cartoon theme and has more in common with the first record: cut-up, metal pieces. Fuck you if you don't buy them both.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: sangre
Comments: Hi Trevor! I'm from Hungary and i like to ask when will any of your band is coming here or near. Sorry for the bad english! Cheers: Sangre

MY ANSWER:
I wish I could tell you. I'd love to visit Eastern Europe, but alas, there is little money there to pay for pinche little bands like the ones I'm in....sorry.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ashley
Comments: I've listened to the Mr. Bungle album California many times, and each time I tend to notice new things. I noticed on retrovertigo that the percussion is done by "beat-boxing" (ie. vocally). Am I correct or does it just sound like that? If so, who does this? It sounds really good.

MY ANSWER:
yes, that is vocal beat-boxing. Who do you think it is? I mean, it IS a vocal part....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: joao do cao
Comments: mr. dunn, as a portuguese fan, i was specially proud to find your taste for fado. i trust you noticed in some songs the distinct sound of the steel strings portuguese guitar (with a varying number of strings - from 12 to ...). you should definitely check the sound of the genius Carlos Paredes. now a question: what other instruments take you to paradise (or hell)? by the way, the influence of ars moriendi is too obvious (movies from kousturica are always a matter of excitement for the portuguese cinephile community) - please take it as a compliment. all the best

MY ANSWER:
yeah, I think it's obvious, too. Although, it's not from a movie. Other instruments that take me to hell? What in gods earth are you talking about. I like the clarinet, the female voice, viola, metal percussion, casios...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Chris
Comments: I have a question for Trevor- or anyone that knows... What work did you do with the Kronos Quartet? I am a bassist, and have worked with a few bands, but I really want some classical influences. I really want to hear what that sounded like... Thank you for always being such an inspirational artist!

MY ANSWER:
Mr. Bungle was commissioned, as a band, to write a piece for Kronos back in 1992. It was given one performance at Theater Artaud in SF. It was way too long and convoluted in my opinion. Sort of a disaster you could say. Each of us could have done a better job individually. You will probably never hear it. Have you checked out Stefano Scodanibbio?


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Steve Haze
Comments: Which Aim has made mr Bungle? I want a new album, by now California, D.V and Mr Bungle are consumed! I want a new album!

MY ANSWER:
Aim to confuse.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: jeff bowen
Comments: trevor, i'm sick of playing simple funk rock in my band, but the rest of them want to continue to wallow in mediocrity. i was wondering how i should break it to them that i would like to incorperate styles of music that we have not touched upon before (modern classical (in the style of khatchaturian), avant garde, ect.)?

MY ANSWER:
Break it to them by breaking up the band, breaking their heads, and breaking out of the prison you now reside in. Funk rock is dead. In fact, it was never born. Do what you want to do before it's too late and you die!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Lydia
Comments: Hi, Trevor. I'm totally not surprised that you were freaked out by The Mouse and His Child. It takes one to know one. I am currently searching for it's score or soundtrack. Any leads? Thank you for your music.

MY ANSWER:
None, whatsoever. It might be worth just putting a microphone, or a 1979 Sanyo tape player up to the TV and then listening to the entire thing, dialogue, narration and all, with the lights out, drinking Limoncello.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dexy's Midnite Runner
Comments: Trevor, I'm curious of what you think about Charlie Hunter and his music. Also do you ever have a chance to catch Stefon Harris there in NY and are you by any chance a part of his 12 piece ensemble that he's touring with now? (Doesn't hurt to ask). Oh and Adam Cruz, do you dig those Blue Note fellaz or are they a bit tame for you?

MY ANSWER:
yeah, haven't bought a Blue Note record in many, many years. I think Hunter is an amazing musician. He is incredibly specialized and untouchable. And no, I'm not in that band.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: i wanna play retrovErtigo (Mr.Bungle) via midi file. Can I? tengo tu permiso? saludos

MY ANSWER:
No me importa que hace usted.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: matt
Comments: hi, i was just reading that you worked with Terry Riley. did you make a record with him? what was it like working with Terry Fucking Riley?

MY ANSWER:
I played in a large ensemble at Mills College, Oakland, CA in a 30th anniversary performace of IN C. My actual, personal interaction with Mr. Riley was
very brief.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Spoon
Comments: Hey Trevor, what do you think of Norah Jones winning all of those grammies (that's if you would regared them as being a prestigious award)... I noticed quite a few of your collaborators feature on the album - Adam Levy, Kenny Wollessen, Rob Burger etc.

MY ANSWER:
I say good for her. In order to win a grammie you have to play music that a fuck of a lot of people want to listen to all the time. I was especially happy
that Jesse Harris won as well, because I think he's a great songwriter.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Cornelius Keizer
Comments: Kiaora Trevor, Are you a fan of synth based music like Skinny Puppy, Ohgr and (the mighty) Kraftwerk?
Have you ever considered emulating synth bass lines on an electric bass; and if so how would you go about this? Rugby sucks,

MY ANSWER:
yeah, Kraftwerk is cool in a sort of retro way. I like songs about pocket calculators. There aren't enough in my opinion. I also like Ladytron which I
guess I would put in that category. I tried some stomp-box once that basically translated what you played into various synth sounds. But ultimately it's not my thing. That is, it's not my forte, or my mode of expression. Not to say that I don't enjoy listening to it.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: can you answer this question what band did paul mc cartney form after the beatle s broke up?
Was it Blondie, the travelling wilburys, Pink Floyd or Wings could you please be quick i'm on a time limit.Please Please Please could you answer on your questions and answers page c u @ the page.

MY ANSWER:
For those of you who often wonder what my private messages say; what possibly could anonymous strangers have to say to me that is so exclusive to not be shared with the public; what dark, scandalous dialogue could be happening "behind the scenes" for someone living the glorious rock n roll lifestyle... Here, my friends, is your answer.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: peter peter
Comments: hey there dude, i here that you are playing with the openly gay homos exual drummer mike "ive got pride" pride. what made you step into the world of new york gay pride music? thanx for spreading the love into the homo sex community. later duuuude!!!!

MY ANSWER:
Hey there. No problem. My pleasure. Keep up the fight! And now a question for you: Is there a reason I should NOT step into the world of "gay pride music?"


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: kris
Comments: so who did you enjoy more Rufus the stunt bum, or bling bling the crack dealer?

MY ANSWER:
In terms of pure enjoyment Rufus takes the cake. Very lovable, real human.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Do you know if it would be possible to send my bands demo tape to Ipecac Recordings? I mean where could i send them? I know! This is a fucking stupid question...sorry about that...and sorry about my english. I'm from Finland and my english sucks. Thanx! Rock!

MY ANSWER:
You guys drink too much in Finland. So the next time you're sober--which is probably the next time the sun comes up there--check out your favorite Ipecac recording. Or just pick one. Go ahead. Go to the record shelf, check the back of the CD. There should be an address there. Ok, step 2: Buy an envelope. Put your demo in the envelope and address it to the record label of your choice. Believe it or not, it's TOTALLY possible. In fact, besides firearms, explosives, alcohol, aerosol cans, drugs and other unlawful items, it's pretty much possible to send stuff places.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: mike McMike
Comments: the second song on California "None of them knew they were robots" I believe the word FENRIS is used. I have looked in the dictionary, a science and technology dictionary, medical dictionary and a latin to english dictionary online and have not found the definition of the word. What is it referring to?

MY ANSWER:
You know, I haven't the slightest fucking idea. Those are Trey's lyrics, and if you know Trey, you know that he knows about a lot of stuff that you don't know about. There are many things in this world that I don't know about and I have chosen to spend my time learning about a small number of them. Therefore you won't find me, for one, spending a lot of time researching that word. Sorry, I mean, I know I'm in the band and all...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: kevin
Comments: i believe you stated before that you would in fact give lessons. is that still so? i've been playing for 10 years now & just want to learn everything i can. i really dig what you do & think i could learn a great deal from you. thanx!

MY ANSWER:
I give occasional lessons (not regular, or weekly). I suggest you introduce yourself in person and we can discuss it further. Thanks for listening!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Potato Maker
Comments: I've heard some various referances on your Q&A about Medeski, MMW, and John Scofield. I'm huge fans of these guys, and I've been busy collecting bootlegs of their live shows. I was wondering if you knew the dates and venue to any sets you have played with these guys, or similar artists.

MY ANSWER:
I've never played with John Scofield. But I know Jesse Murphy, a really great bassist who was with "Sco" for a while. You can often see "Murph" playing with the Love Trio down at Nublu (Ave C between 5th and 6th). My performances with Medeski have been limited to various Electric Masada gigs which are usually at Tonic in NYC or abroad.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Trevor Dunn- have you or Mr.Bungle had your equipment stolen before? ive been playing bass for 2 years and just recently a cocaine addict stole mine,its dampered my skills. just curious thanks

MY ANSWER:
It's never happened to me, knock on wood... You should check with ALL of the pawn shops within 100 miles of the scene of the crime. Also, for future
reference, insure you instruments! Keep photos and copies of the serial number in a safe place.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: lee harvey phonics
Comments: I'm going to San Francisco for part of my reading week and was wondering if there are any must see must do things that you'd recommend to someone? (there's a max ernst display on at one of the museums that i've been hipped to already) thanks bro.

MY ANSWER:
Ah, the city by the bay...
La Tacqueria on Mission and 25th st. There's a good Butoh festival that happens around August, I think. Ameoba. Check out Donald Baily playing at Bakar. Pet cemetery in the Presidio. GG Park. Castro Theater. Chez Panisse in Berkeley. Mills College library. Yank Sing. Farley's coffee.....


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Zach
Comments: A question: When writing a song which has lyrics/singing, is it hard to imagine someone singing it? Since you know Patton I'd imagine that it helps, but what about when he isn't singing what you write? Singers tend to be cheesy fellows; how do you make sure that the finnished product (say Retrovertigo/Vanity Fair) turns out how you want it to? I have also been reading the guestbook, and despite what a couple of people feel the urge to write, it is very much appreciated that you make yourself available at all. Most people would not. Please continue.

MY ANSWER:
It's definitely not easy writing for vocals, especially if you don't have the chops to work on it yourself at home. Vocalists do a lot of weird things in terms of phrasing, breathing and dynamics that instrumentalists just don't do. Also, words add another dimension. Sometimes what is written down on the page, when played or sang, sounds really stupid.

It's good to know a person's comfortable range. I'm spoiled because Patton's range is so wide and his ear so refined that I can pretty much write anything in any key, and he'll be able to sing it, and make it sound better than I expected.

Whether you have the chops or not it's good to really think about the "sing-ablity" of the material. Is what you're writing really for the voice, or is it for
another instrument? Sing it yourself to see if it is in anyway vocal or not. The voice is not only about the throat and lungs, it's also about the tongue.
Vowels, consonants...all that shit comes into play.

I think imagining the sound of voice is the same as any other instrument or instrumental combination. It's best to know the voice/person your're working with and to learn the limitations, strengths, etc. And also to be flexible as a composer. For more on the voice or any other orchestral instrument check out Alfred Blatter's book Instrumentation and Orchestration.

As for your last comment: my pleasure! It's not long that we have on this planet and I feel the sharing of knowledge, or the sharing of inquiry for that matter, is priceless. Especially in small circles.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Just a quick question- Have there been an really memorable recording experiences i.e; where everything just worked, that come to mind. Also who are some of the best engineers and studios that you have worked with? I love your music and thanks a lot.

MY ANSWER:
Most of the filmworks stuff I have done with Zorn has been incredibly efficient and painless. The Twice Told Tales record was recording in less than
two hours and our set-up time was almost zero thanks to the engineering mastery of Jim Anderson. Avatar and Systems Two (the Marciano brothers) are both incredible NY studios. And thank YOU.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: paige
Comments: Could you forsee yourself, lombardo, or buzz having any significant compositional contributions to the fantomas project, i understand its his baby but the direction might be more creative and less wasted with the level of writing talent in the band? you should consider updating your reccomendations regularly, its nice having an objective dude with taste on the web.

MY ANSWER:
yeah, I could foresee it, but each of us has other outlets. For the time being, I like things the way they are.
I try to update this site regularly but it's never as frequently as I would like. Thanks for viewing!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Eamonn
Comments: Do you have any favourite foreign movies to suggest? Just on a minor note, someone mentioned Macabre and rather stupidly stated they were like DEP. They're not at all but still a fine band. Do you not like them?

MY ANSWER:
Oh, I like the usual suspects like Bunuel and Godard. I also like a lot of those films that Takemitsu did the music for like Nagisa Oshima's Empire of Passion or Shinoda's Double Suicide. Kusturica's Underground is unforgettable. Alphaville; Branded to Kill....

I'm not a big Macabre fan. I do remember when they first appeared and blew my mind. I was, like, 18 or some such shit. Christ, I'm old.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Vince
Comments: Trevor, The Electric Masada show this past saturday was incredible. You played one solo, and it was very nice, very fitting, if a bit reserved (it seemed). Why no more than one solo for you? Is there a reason that you played (mostly) ostinato patterns the whole time? wups, that's two questions. oh well. poop dragon.

MY ANSWER:
I don't make the decisions about when to solo in that band. That comes from the guy waving his arms around and playing the saxophone. My role in that band, as everyone else's, is pretty much specified and controlled by the leader. Sometimes, as a bass player, it's difficult to make your one moment of soloing shine, especially in the midst of your role as foundation. On the other hand, maybe I was feeling reserved...who knows...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Tangento
Comments: I am bothered by 'Holy Filament'. Bothered by the fact that it reminds me of some music I heard somewhere as a little kid, in the limbo somewhere between the demise of the 60's and the dawning of the Age of Aquarius. Is there something specific you can point to, or a genre, or is it just influenced by a certain mood you were in at the time? In other words, I just need *something* to reference that insanely cool track TO.

MY ANSWER:
Thanks for being bothered. That makes me feel good in some weird way... I don't know where that song came from. The chord progression and melody where written way back during the DV sessions. The arrangement and bridge came later. At the time I was listening to this Peggy Lee album called Is That All There Is? But I don't think that will help you much. Could it possibly be referencing an album that freaked me out as a child? Walt Disney's Black Beauty? Probably not, plus, I grew up in the 70s.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Surrealestate Agent
Comments: Hey ya Trevor, Saw that you've mentioned Willie Nelson and Jerry Reed on your "The More You Know..." section. Any other favorite country / western artists (and which albums)? Any favorite movies by Ford or Goddard? Keep up the excellent work!

MY ANSWER:
Patsy Cline, Johnny Cash, George Jones, Hank Williams, Tammy Wynette---pretty much anything by these incredible artists; Treasure of Sierra Madre;
Contempt.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: hey trevor, do you change the positioning of your bass when playing in Fantomas? It looks like it's lower than some other times i've seen you with say your 5 string with mr.B.... is this because it's easier to for "thrash picking"?

MY ANSWER:
Yes, basically. A lot of the Fantomas music requires more forearm and shoulder leverage. My 5-string has come down a bit over the years. I used to be one of those guys who was potentially raising it up to the chin and then I realized that not only did it look stupid, but it was putting my right hand wrist into a really awkward angle. Fuck that. And YOU, stop paying so much attention, damnit!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: shane
Comments: trevor, hey how you doing? i was wondering where i would be able to find your debutantes and centipedes cd, i went to every cd store in my area and they all told me it was out of print! thanks

MY ANSWER:
Hey, I'm doing fine, thanks. I'm pretty sure it's NOT out of print. I've seen copies on line at amazon.com and cdnow.com (some are used and cheap!)


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: ....
Comments: mr. dunn; been playing six stringed guitars for roughly three years and have been recently seriously considering the investment of an upright bass. i've researched sales online, but would rather have some purchasing advice from a man such as yourself. What (or where) would you recommend a beginner to this field start with? thanks for your time.

MY ANSWER:
check your local string shop. In NYC there is David Gage. I would say, for a beginner, look for a plywood bass(the top of the body is plywood). There are some great ones and they are much cheaper. I'm sure you could get a good one for under $1000. My advice is to play as many as you can get your hands on (regardless of price) until you know what feel and sound you're looking for. Sound is something that you can develop and improve (via technique and actual repairs/upgrades to the instrument). The physical "feel" of the instrument, I think, is less flexible. So look for something that feels comfortable to you. Of course, you want a nice, big sound, but that may be something that comes later with the instrument. Obviously, don't buy something that sounds like absolute shit just because it feels good. If you go to a place like Gage you can make an appointment to try basses in your price range, and you can rest assured that they know what they are doing there. They won't rip you off, and they can advise you on what needs to be done in terms of improvements. Good luck!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Sir Millard Mulch
Comments: Comments and Question for Trevor:
In comparing the demo version of Platypus with the album version, I notice mainly a difference in the performance of the players as a whole -- on the demo version, the notes were all very accurate and "hard", like a rock album, and the performance on the album version has a lot of washed-out playing, like a classical or jazz album. In the production, it sounds like not as much close mic'ing. This is very noticable, especially in the rhythm section... aside from the piles of Kipple on top of the album version. I apologize for bringing up such an old tune, but it seems to me to be the best representation of this idea I can think of. My question is this: what was the motivation behind that radical change in timbre, and how purposeful was it? I strongly suspect the shift in approach to the performances even between the other demo songs from Disco Volante and their counterpart album versions was premeditated by the entire band. Just curious. Thanks.
-Millard.

MY ANSWER:
It depends on what demo you're talking about, because there are several versions of that song. One being from about 1989. Platypus was originally recorded for the first Bungle album, but didn't make the final cut, due to contextual considerations. After continuing to play it for years and then deciding it might work on DV, I decided to re-arrange/interpret the song. That song in particular is one of our more collaborative. And the re-arrangement was also collective, mostly between Trey, Danny and myself.

Ultimately, we were sick of playing the song, but wanted to salvage it and give it a chance on a record. This led us to collapse the song in on itself so to speak. In terms of the performance we did what came naturally after playing something until sick of it, so I don't think that aspect was very conscious. Also, we were much more familiar with the material which took on a malleable quality, as might happen with a jazz tune. The mic-ing: all I can say is different studio, different engineer, different time, etc...


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: jim
Comments: a couple days after sept. 11th 2001 you played with fantomas in chicago. after the show i gave your road manager "tony" a kalimba (thumb piano)and a pack of blood capsules to give to patton. do you know if he recieved them? also... as a musician/composer, do you ever get in a rut and cant write? and if you do, how do you get out of that rut? or do you?

MY ANSWER:
yes, he received them. He put the kalimba in his butt and sold the capsules to a minor under the notion that they were downers.

I definitely experience writers block. To remedy this, I go back and forth between instruments (piano, guitar, bass), read scores, go to museums, stop
thinking about music for a while, listen to Stravinsky, watch Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas....whatever works.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Pirha
Comments: Will we hear Mr. Dunn playing more on SC3's Book Of Truth than in Book M?

MY ANSWER:
I haven't got the slightest idea what you're talking about. But my guess is no.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Jago
Comments: Only stupid questions;
1. What videogames are you playing right now and what systems do you own or prefer? (add all the games you like)
2. What do you think of Gregg Turkington's Bands: Zip Code Rapists, Three Doctors, Faxed Head, Bon larvis Band, Neil Hamburger?

MY ANSWER:
1. Is pinball a videogame? I've been playing Simpson's pinball down the street at a local bar n grill.
2. I love Faxed Head, especially live. Neil Hamburger is also good particularly good live. The other stuff I haven't heard.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: wade
Comments: Dunn, you rock my world! i grew up on the Mr.B!
ide like to ask some numbskull questions:
* Is there a Mr.Bungle memorial in Eureka,CA in anyway?
* What did you make that giant face mask from in the early days of MB that you wore on stage? or was it store bought?
*sorry if these questions annoyed you*
-The Wade

MY ANSWER:
1. By memorial are you suggesting death? There are many Bungle treasures all over Eureka. You should go there, spend a few weeks or longer. Get to know the people, the dialect, the crab. Smoke some pot, climb a redwood, smell the pulpmill. You will find them
2.That mask was custom-made based on my design by mask maker Nina Barlow in San Francisco. It's made of paper pulp.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Cink Refinsta
Comments: Mr. Dunn, I'm a guitar player and have tried many times to start up a group.. The dillema is the people I try to play with are either not interested in creating art (in other words, long to be pop stars) or look down their nose at me according to whatever small subsection of music they listen to dictates (i.e. "You're not this or that enough). The musicians that I've known for a couple years always fall into the first group, and they're not even that good... My question is should i try hard to forge something enjoyable with my friends who don't really like similar music and want pop attention, Or if the answer is no, Where do I look, short of the academic route, for musicians who just want to make good music? I've put out ads and talked to everyone I could... Does Sacramento just suck?

MY ANSWER:
yeah, not a big fan of Sacramento. I would venture towards the Bay Area, or NYC. There ARE people out there with inst rests similar to yours. If you have a particular vision, perhaps you should become a control-freak, autocrat band leader and pay people to play your music. It might be the right thing to do. But also consider that it might be awhile before you're truly happy with your company. Where does your music come from? Maybe you should go to the source.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: kitchens
Comments: Ever written with a fisher space pen? They are the coolest pens ever created!

MY ANSWER:
Some say the pen is mightier than the sword. Well I say fuck the pen. Cuz you and DIE by the sword! EEEEEEEEAAAAAAaaaaaaaaarrrrrrrrggg!!!!!!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Luke
Comments: Hey Trevor, would your life change dramatically if Mr Bungle went multi-platinum with the next album. Is Axlanbay a good name for a band? Ciao.

MY ANSWER:
moot point, but no.
Axlanbay is a stupid name. What about The Squealing Pigs, or howabout The Cordless Ameobas, or say, Five Chinese Backpackers, or Your Brain Has Swamp? or Pezless. or Din. or Slackjaw Yokle.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name:
Comments: How much importance do you place on technique? How much time a day/week would you say you devote to it? Sometimes I feel like I get too fixated on it, and it effects my productivity? Has this ever happened to you, and if so (aside from playing with my own feces) do you have any suggestions that might help ease this brand of anal retention?

MY ANSWER:
I place a lot of importance on technique. I feel it's priceless to have total control of your instrument in order to make it do what you want it to do. But, yes, it can be a trap sometimes. Many people who practice getting faster and more efficient on their instrument always sound exactly like that.
Fast and efficient. Sometimes I say, who cares? There are other aspects of music to develop: your ears, spontaneity, expression, knowledge away from the instrument, etc. Give yourself a break sometimes. Play music for the pure enjoyment of it. Hold on to that feeling of why you wanted to be a musician in the first place before you had ANY IDEA.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: travis
Comments: hey Trevor, 2 questions, do you listen to any hip-hop music?

MY ANSWER:
Not really, although I do like some Missy Elliot, earlier Jay-Z...Dalek! Is that hip-hop? Classic Public Enemy.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: NeverWhistleWhileUrPissing
Comments: Are all the ILLUMINATUS TRIOLOGY/DISCORDIA/Shea and Robert Anton Wilson referances through-out Bungle and Chiefs material something thats common knowledge to most fans? Hoping you would talk a little about the connection. thanks

MY ANSWER:
I would say no. I would also say it's probably not even common knowledge to most of the band!


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: Can you tell me where can i order Mr.Bungle t-shirts and stuff..there is no way that i could find a shirt from any store here.

MY ANSWER:
I believe that mrbungle.com, or bungle.com or something...anyway it's, like, an official website, might be coming into existence soon with the sole purpose of selling t-shirts....hmmmm, more logic from the worlds non-est band.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Barefoot G.
Comments: I was going to ask you for advice on bass instruction... but you seem to get alot of that. So to break up the ho-hum I figured I'd ask this: If animals could understand the numerous languages humans spoke and we didn't know they possessed this knowlege would we be screwed? Thank you.

MY ANSWER:
I think we're screwed regardless.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Ryan F.
Comments: Trevor-I love the sound you get. It is incredible. What is your main bass and rig that you use for mr. bungle? also, what type of strings do you use on your electrics? upright?

MY ANSWER:
SWR SM-400 with an SWR 4x10 Goliath Jr Cabinet.
Electric: D'Addario regular, nickel. Upright: Tomastik SuperFlexible (ropecore).


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Justin
Comments: Hey Trev; quick question. On The Directors Cut for One Step Beyond and I believe The Omen it states that those are re-mixes. So what's up with the first mixes of those songs and where can I hear them if possible? Take it easy dude.

MY ANSWER:
They don't exist in all honesty. Those are actually home recorded versions by the arranger, intended for demo purposes, but too good to re-do.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Damon Strickland
Comments: My questions to dunn is about midi and keyboards and how to make them work with a band

MY ANSWER:
Midi Schmidi. I don't understand your question. How to make keyboards work in a band? What century are you from? Plug it in and go, bitch!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Dorian
Comments: Come on, admit it! You were obsessed with Flea when you started out. The balls on the head, the moves. It is so obvious!!! It's nothing to be ashamed of. Flea is a God and you worshipped him. Don't deny it. I freely admit to impersonating you when I'm on stage. And you so enjoyed being Flea at your Halloween show with Mr Bungle. Fess up Roy!

MY ANSWER:
Nope, sorry. He sucks. I was way more into Fishbone and Bad Manners back in the day. If I want to listen to somebody ripping off Louis Johnson or James Jamerson....oh fuck, what am I saying...that Fleabag can't touch them!!


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Shuvankar1
Comments: I have studied the music of Mr.Bungle quiet extensivly (I'am a second year university student majoring in comp) and am most amazed at the thematic qualties I can find in almost every MR.Bungle album. For Example, the constant use of bells or chimes in almost every song in California, or Mike using almost exclusivly his head voice, or the constant use of reverb. Or in Disco Volante with its noise core sections, and the many jazz pieces. Regardless of writing credits these themes reside amongs most of the songs on the albums. My question is, how does this come about? Is this a group band decision on focusing on themes (musical & instrumental), kind of picking and choosing, or is every one in the band at once into reverb, chimes, bass picking, and slide guitar (the shared themes in an album)?

MY ANSWER:
I think, in general, it's the latter, which is why we worked well together. The musical tastes were uncannily complimentary. Certain things, like spring
reverb became almost a signature sound. And the studio was our real playground, especially with percussionist William Wynant at our disposal. It often blew my mind how often we were all on the same page, compositionally speaking. I can't really explain it. I think it was a Eureka thing.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Annie
Comments: When is this stupid Bungle bickering going to end? Bungle is the best thing any of your guys ever do/have done, especially you, Trevor. Sounds like everyone in the band wants to do it except you and Mike. What gives? How can you turn your back on the thing that has touched and influenced the most amount of people out of anything you have ever done? Very troubling.

MY ANSWER:
Fuck you. You don't know jack-shit. I'll tell you what gives: You're an idiot.


YOUR QUESTION:
PRIVATE
Comments: hi trevor, long time since i seen you know,
1, will you be touring the uk europe (not fantomas ) any time soon are you looking for anyone to book any shows in wales
2, do you make a living out of music or do you have a job to pay the bills

MY ANSWER:
1)yes, coming right up 2)not at the moment
3)I make my living solely as a professional musician.


YOUR QUESTION:
Name: Benjamin
Comments: Hey trevor,
Mr bungle seem to take long periods of time to release new stuff, is this the way the band likes to work, or you guys busy with other projects?.......iam hangin out for your next album 4 sure!

MY ANSWER:
Part of those periods were, as you suggest, filled with other projects but mostly I think they were the result of blowing our wad each time. Most bands that churn out an album every year or two are churning out the same tired shit. If there is one thing I'm proud of, it's that all three Bungle albums are completely different entities, coming from different places, referencing different things, but somehow creating a linear trilogy.

It takes a long time to come up with that shit, not to mention, arrange, rehearse, record....Those albums were taken very seriously from beginning to end. So I, for one, was quite fond of the long periods of repose between. It gave us time to tour, reflect and then invent something we'd never done before.

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